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The Green State

I don't believe in the red state or the blue state.

This blog is run by an american who lives in scotland.

this blog loves: choice, atheism, universal healthcare, the american green party, the scottish national party, and puppies.

this blog dislikes: free market libertarianism, anti-choice propaganda, religion, and people who ask annoying questions for no apparent reason

Questions, comments, concerns? greenstate.tumblr.com/ask

these jerks who are refusing to accept their mail if it has a harvey milk stamp on it

sure, fine. send all your mail back. because that’s definitely how mail works. we’re all free to just send the mail back if it has a stamp we don’t like on it. 

Your a fucking retard for believing seth or Judd had any impact on that shooting. Your doing exactly what the media and journalist want you to do which is make this a story and give them money. You take a headline and add two stars names and you get a lot of advertisement money that's all this is. Your a slave to the media. asked by bsripa

You had me at “Your.”

All but one of the mass murders in the U.S. over the last 30 years has been committed by men. The fact that gender is often omitted from the story speaks to how we still see the masculine as the irreproachable and invisible standard. As Michael Kimmel notes in his extensive research on school shootings, if the genders were reversed and most school shootings were committed by women, you’d bet gender would be part of the analysis.

We often instead shift the conversation to “mental illness” and describe shooters as madmen, while the characteristics they exhibit are often an extension of toxic masculinity ideals that are institutionally reinforced.

What Elliot Rodger Said About Women Reveals Why We Need to Stamp Out Misogyny (via disabilityhistory)

(via liberalsarecool)

Black Crime =Gang Violence. Arab Crime = Terrorism. Hispanic Crime = Illegal immigration. White Crime = No crime, he was just insane.

@KattWilliams

here we go again. white kid carries out plan to murder people and already the mainstream media is going through with the “he was disturbed,” “he was mentally ill” and “he was insane” spin on the story. gotta protect that image of white purity and innocence no matter what.

(via misandry-mermaid)

(Source: , via agirlfromottawa)

The simple fact is, much like with their friends on the right from the tobacco industry to the oil industry to the megachurch, science and information are the enemies of the NRA. They have proven they will do whatever it takes to make sure we have less of it, and more Santa Barbaras.

The NRA Has Blood on its Hands (via azspot)

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

knowyourmeme:

As always, it’s incredibly tragic to be at the start of the cycle again.

knowyourmeme:

As always, it’s incredibly tragic to be at the start of the cycle again.

Not all men!

—all men

As harsh as this sounds – your dead kids don’t trump my Constitutional rights.

That’s an actual quote from an open letter to the parents of victims of the mass shooting in California, written by an actual human being.

Specifically, it’s Samuel Wurzelbacher (who was briefly and bizarrely famous as Joe the Plumber) … just doing whatever he can to keep the checks rolling in by providing ill-informed commentary on issues of the day. When it comes to political commentary from people who are famous for no discernable reason, I think we’d do just as well to ask Kim Kardashian or Paris Hilton to write about gun control and unspeakable tragedy because I suspect they wouldn’t write anything nearly so odious as Wurzelbacher has.

Luckily, Adam Weinstein looks at the bigger picture behind this radicalized plumber’s reaction to an aggrieved father’s statement about guns, politics, and the NRA:

There’s something refreshingly honest in Joe’s acknowledgement that this tragedy is all about him. It’s the reductio ad absurdum of an ethos that’s obsessed with the self and the self’s freedom without a concomitant empathy for other selves and their freedoms. Joe’s rant illuminates quite starkly how the right-libertarian absolutist interpretation of individual rights comes into direct conflict with the lives of his fellow countrymen and their children. To talk of responsibilities is to water down a right, and we cannot do that, no matter what the cost!

In this sense, Wurzelbacher is the (loud)mouthpiece for a fairly sizeable group of citizens and he nicely/horrifyingly captures the way they view their rights, namely completely free of duties or responsibilities.

(via kohenari)

(Source: donotlink.com, via kohenari)

GIRLS ARE NOT A THING YOU GET. They’re not a goody bag at the end of the frat party.

Memo to Seth Rogen.

You’re not a victim of the Santa Barbara killings

(via think-progress)

Women are also not a thing you get to be in movies, like costumes or lights. We are not to be “gotten.” Fuck all of you, seriously, and no, not interested in shutting up about it until we are no longer things. To a man, we must no longer be things.

(via someauthorgirl)

Well, someone just lost all the points they gained from the Macklemore debacle.

(via stfupenguins)

(via stfupenguins)

ann hornaday wrote this article for the washington post, stating that she believes that our culture has certainly contributed to a sense of male entitlement that people like elliot rodger feel:


Indeed, as important as it is to understand Rodger’s actions within the context of the mental illness he clearly suffered, it’s just as clear that his delusions were inflated, if not created, by the entertainment industry he grew up in. With his florid rhetoric of self-pity, aggression and awkwardly forced “evil laugh,” Rodger resembled a noxious cross between Christian Bale’s slick sociopath in “American Psycho,” the thwarted womanizer in James Toback’s “The Pick-Up Artist” and every Bond villain in the canon.



How many students watch outsized frat-boy fantasies like “Neighbors” and feel, as Rodger did, unjustly shut out of college life that should be full of “sex and fun and pleasure”? How many men, raised on a steady diet of Judd Apatow comedies in which the shlubby arrested adolescent always gets the girl, find that those happy endings constantly elude them and conclude, “It’s not fair”?



Every year, San Diego State University researcher Martha Lauzen releases a “Celluloid Ceiling” report in which she delivers distressing statistics regarding the state of women in Hollywood. This year, she found that women made up just 16 percent of directors, writers, producers, cinematographers and editors working on the top 250 movies of 2013; similarly, women accounted for just 15 percent of protagonists in those films.
Even if 51 percent of our movies were made by women, Elliot Rodger still would have been seriously ill. But it’s worth examining who gets to be represented on screen, and how. It makes sense to ask, as cartoonist Alison Bechdel does in her eponymous Bechdel Test, whether a movie features (1) at least two named female characters who (2) talk to each other about (3) something besides a man. And it bears taking a hard look at whether we’re doing more subtle damage to our psyches and society by so drastically limiting our collective imagination.

predictably, seth rogen and judd apatow threw a little tantrum over the whole thing, which incidentally is being given a lot more media attention than the initial article itself (isn’t that always the way?)
i see what this critic is saying, and i think she makes some valid points here. no one is saying that judd apatow and seth rogen are to blame for people being murdered. what she is saying, however, is that our culture feeds men certain ideas through pop culture, which, when combined with other aspects of rape culture, does little to dissuade men from feeling entitled to whatever they want. and the reaction that rogen and apatow have to her article just reinforces the idea that men, no matter how much they may contribute to sexism, can’t possibly be blamed. instead, let’s call it a mental illness issue. because that’s easier for people to people to understand. 
hell, i bet if dudes could find a way to blame the female menstrual cycle for elliot rodger’s actions, they would. anything to absolve men (and their precious feelings) of any wrongdoing. 
judd apatow, you’re not the whole problem, but as piebald once said, “hey! you’re part of it!” 

ann hornaday wrote this article for the washington post, stating that she believes that our culture has certainly contributed to a sense of male entitlement that people like elliot rodger feel:

Indeed, as important as it is to understand Rodger’s actions within the context of the mental illness he clearly suffered, it’s just as clear that his delusions were inflated, if not created, by the entertainment industry he grew up in. With his florid rhetoric of self-pity, aggression and awkwardly forced “evil laugh,” Rodger resembled a noxious cross between Christian Bale’s slick sociopath in “American Psycho,” the thwarted womanizer in James Toback’s “The Pick-Up Artist” and every Bond villain in the canon.

How many students watch outsized frat-boy fantasies like “Neighbors” and feel, as Rodger did, unjustly shut out of college life that should be full of “sex and fun and pleasure”? How many men, raised on a steady diet of Judd Apatow comedies in which the shlubby arrested adolescent always gets the girl, find that those happy endings constantly elude them and conclude, “It’s not fair”?

Every year, San Diego State University researcher Martha Lauzen releases a “Celluloid Ceiling” report in which she delivers distressing statistics regarding the state of women in Hollywood. This year, she found that women made up just 16 percent of directors, writers, producers, cinematographers and editors working on the top 250 movies of 2013; similarly, women accounted for just 15 percent of protagonists in those films.

Even if 51 percent of our movies were made by women, Elliot Rodger still would have been seriously ill. But it’s worth examining who gets to be represented on screen, and how. It makes sense to ask, as cartoonist Alison Bechdel does in her eponymous Bechdel Test, whether a movie features (1) at least two named female characters who (2) talk to each other about (3) something besides a man. And it bears taking a hard look at whether we’re doing more subtle damage to our psyches and society by so drastically limiting our collective imagination.

predictably, seth rogen and judd apatow threw a little tantrum over the whole thing, which incidentally is being given a lot more media attention than the initial article itself (isn’t that always the way?)

i see what this critic is saying, and i think she makes some valid points here. no one is saying that judd apatow and seth rogen are to blame for people being murdered. what she is saying, however, is that our culture feeds men certain ideas through pop culture, which, when combined with other aspects of rape culture, does little to dissuade men from feeling entitled to whatever they want. and the reaction that rogen and apatow have to her article just reinforces the idea that men, no matter how much they may contribute to sexism, can’t possibly be blamed. instead, let’s call it a mental illness issue. because that’s easier for people to people to understand. 

hell, i bet if dudes could find a way to blame the female menstrual cycle for elliot rodger’s actions, they would. anything to absolve men (and their precious feelings) of any wrongdoing. 

judd apatow, you’re not the whole problem, but as piebald once said, “hey! you’re part of it!” 

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